Blogs

The joy of recording

London Recorders Day 2018Guest blog by Maria Longley. London Recorders’ Day is a 1-day event to celebrate wildlife recording in London happening on the 10th of November 2018. It is collaboratively organised by GiGL, FSC, and NHM. Our keynote address this year will be from David Lindo who many of us know as the Urban Birder. As a keen birder and someone with many years of experience of wildlife recording we thought he was the perfect person to kick start the day of celebrating recording in London.

BeeBlitzes, Bumblebees and other Bizarre Adventures

Guest blog by Rosa Pietroiusti. A young person’s tale of gaining expePhoto (c) Henry Uptonrience in conservation with the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, and what she found along the way…

Looking for a career in conservation?

Katy Potts leading a BioLinks coures

Guest blog by Roger Morris. There is fierce competition for jobs in conservation, so the big question is ‘how to make yourself stand out from the crowd?’ The answer is to put yourself in the shoes of the team tasked with sifting all those applications. I used to do this job as part of recruiting new staff, and it was incredibly difficult.

 

Great finds on BioLinks courses

Attendees on a BioLinks courseWe’ve seen some fantastic species during the BioLinks training events we’ve had so far this summer – some rare, some stunningly beautiful, some common as muck, but all completely fascinating.  We've also had our fair share of Nationally Notable species.

For the love of flies

Marin Harvey teaching on a Learn to Love flies workshopGuest blog by Martin Harvey. The BioLinks project has taken a fresh look at how we can encourage people to follow a pathway towards expertise in some of the more neglected insect groups. This pathway starts with the “Learn to love ...” courses, which give people an introduction to a species group and its natural history, without going too far into complex technical terms and concepts.

QGIS - is there something missing?

QGIS Screenshot

The FSC QGIS Plugin has been helping UK biological recorders to visualise and analyse their records since November 2014. FSC BioLinks will provide ongoing support for the plugin until, at least, the end of 2022. We want to hear your ideas about how we can improve and extend the functionality of the plugin to make it even more useful to you. Do you have ideas? However trivial or outlandish you think they are, we want to hear them. There's every chance that the thing you've always wanted QGIS to do, as a biological recorder, could become part of the next major release of the FSC QGIS plugin.

Citizen Scientists Reveal Stark Decline of the Enigmatic Common Clubtail Dragonfly

Common Clubtail - Gomphus vulgatissimus - by Christophe BrochardGuest blog by Genvieve Dalley. The results of the biggest Dragonfly citizen science project ever to hit Great Britain have revealed the ‘Near Threatened’ Common Clubtail is absent on many of the surveyed rivers. However, there was also a ray of hope as the species was spotted for the first time in Devon. 

Putting the invertebrates in order

Books on the Fabre shelfGuest blog by Siiri Hubbard and Nigel Kelly. Melville Louis Kossuth Dewey (1851-1931), was an American librarian, entrepreneur, womaniser, spelling reformer and inventor of a decimal-based system for the organisation of knowledge in libraries.  He divided all knowledge into ten broad subject areas, such as science 500-599; divided each of those areas into ten, such as animals 590-599; divided each of those into ten, such as 598 birds; and so on, such as 598.9 raptors.  Whether it’s books, reports or cdROMs, you can assign them a Dewey number, and all the items on similar subjects in your library and its catalogue come together.  As the meerkat (599.742) says, “simples”.

Addressing the generational skills gap

FSC BioLinks will deliver 60+ training courses per year over 5 years (c) Keiron Derek Brown In 2016 the Field Studies Council (FSC) was awarded a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund to develop a project to address the lack of people able to identify and record difficult species groups, with a focus on the West Midlands and South East regions of England. We spent nearly a year consulting with a wide range of professionals and volunteers involved in the natural history sector and something  become very clear: professionals and volunteers alike expressed their concerns that not enough young people were joining the ranks of biological recorders and it is widely recognised that a generational skills gap is developing in field and identification skills, largely due to changes in the way biology and ecology is taught at all levels of the education system.

Plugin the gap...reflections on teaching QGIS for the FSC. Guest blog by Matt Davies

Matt Davies, FSC Associate TutorGuest blog by Matt Davies. I like maps. I always have. I can thank both my father, a town planner, and the Scouts for nurturing my interest. With such a background, it’s no surprise that that during my university degrees I developed an interest in GIS!

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